Identification of UK Mesozoic Vertebrate Teeth

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Pachystropheus rhaeticus Choristodere Tooth.

These primitive crocodile-like choristodere teeth are extremely rare to find. They are difficult to distinguish from Severnichthys teeth except that they are recurved with prominent carinae and have striae restricted basally. This rooted specimen is 8mm in height and rests along side what I think is an associated rostral bone. It was found in the Westbury Formation, Penarth Group of Penarth, South Glamorgan, Wales.

Eurycleidus sp. Plesiosaur Tooth.

These teeth are uncommon to find and this one measures 24mm in height. However. Note - the tiny Lissodus minimus shark tooth at the bottom left of the picture. This specimen was found in the Intraformational Conglomerate (which is also known as the Basal Bone Bed) of the Westbury Formation, Penarth Group of Aust Cliff, South Gloucestershire.

Leptonectes sp. Ichthyosaur Tooth.

These conical teeth with thick ribbed roots are uncommon to find and this one from a juvenile measures 7mm in height. This specimen was found in the Intraformational Conglomerate (which is also known as the Basal Bone Bed) of the Westbury Formation, Penarth Group of Aust Cliff, South Gloucestershire.

Lepidotes sp. Fish Jaw ?

This rare fish jaw has many tiny button teeth in it and measures just 10mm in length. It was found in the Westbury Formation, Penarth Group of Aust Cliff, South Gloucestershire.

Severnichthys acuminatus Fish Tooth.

This tooth is the larger uncommon 'sigmodial' shape type. The scale is shown in (cm). This lateral tooth is 17mm in height and was found in the Intraformational Conglomerate (which is also known as the Basal Bone Bed) of the Westbury Formation, Penarth Group of Aust Cliff, South Gloucestershire.

Severnichthys acuminatus Fish Tooth.

This tooth is the smaller common 'conical' shape type. This tooth is 8mm in height and was found in the Intraformational Conglomerate (which is also known as the Basal Bone Bed) of the Westbury Formation, Penarth Group of Aust Cliff, South Gloucestershire.

Lissodus minimus x 2 Shark Teeth.

These teeth are the most common to find in the size range 2mm to 4mm. However, they are rare to find approaching their maximum size at approximately 7mm across. The largest lateral tooth here is 7mm across the base (exhibiting a beautiful unworn crown) and was found in the Westbury Formation, Penarth Group of Blue Anchor, Somerset. Preppared and photographed by Sam McAuliffe.

Rhomphaiodon ('Hybodus') minor Shark Dorsal Spine.

These spines can measure up to 150mm in height and are rare to find complete. However, fragments may be found on most field trips. This partial spine which is the distal end (top part) is 75mm in height and was found in the Intraformational Conglomerate (which is also known as the Basal Bone Bed) of the Westbury Formation, Penarth Group of Aust Cliff, South Gloucestershire. Preppared by Chris Traxon.

Rhomphaiodon ('Hybodus') minor Shark Tooth.

These teeth are fairly common to find in the size range 2mm to 4mm. However, they are rare to find approaching their maximum size at approximately 10mm in height. This specimen is 9mm across the base and was found in the Intraformational Conglomerate (which is also known as the Basal Bone Bed) of the Westbury Formation, Penarth Group of Aust Cliff, South Gloucestershire.

Hybodus cloacinus Shark Tooth.

These teeth are rare to find complete. They are difficult to distinguish with Rhomphaiodon except that they can approach 25mm in height and width. This specimen is 16mm across the base and was found in the Intraformational Conglomerate (which is also known as the Basal Bone Bed) of the Westbury Formation, Penarth Group of Aust Cliff, South Gloucestershire.

Nemacanthus monilifer Shark Dorsal Spine.

These dorsal spines are extremely rare to find complete. However, fragments may be found on most field trips. Spines from adults are known to approach 100mm in height. However, this near complete adult spine is 115mm in height and was found in the Westbury Formation, Penarth Group Late Triassic of Blue Anchor Point, Somerset. It is not known which teeth belong to this species ! Preppared by Chris Traxon.

Lissodus minimus Shark Tooth.

These teeth are the most common to find in the size range 2mm to 4mm. However, they are rare to find approaching their maximum size at approximately 7mm across. This lateral tooth is 7mm across the base and was found in the Intraformational Conglomerate (which is also known as the Basal Bone Bed) of the Westbury Formation, Penarth Group of Aust Cliff, South Gloucestershire.